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20121101
20121130
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CSPAN2 20
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English 20
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
-span. next is felix from california. caller: good morning. i mean democratic voter. -- i am an independent voter. what i heard from joe biden today is the fact that the problem we have always had is that the problems were caused by a republican. mitt romney -- host: thanks for the call. good afternoon caroline. caller: i am proud to be what i am. host: go ahead with your thoughts on this election. caller: my thought right now is joe biden >> tomorrow night watch election results from the presidential race as well as house, senate and governors contest across the country. we'll have coverage of president obama in chicago and the mitt romney in boston. victory and concession speeche speeches,. >> we are engaged in the process and been working first in with fema, to make an overall assessment, that 25, up to 25% of those cell towers were disabled during this process. what the fcc does and will continue to do is to work with these entities, to assess the situation on the ground and to more so use this information to see where we can do adequate for. >> commissioner mignon clyburn on issues fac
of california is adjourned. [applause] >> tell us what you think about our programming this weekend. tweet us, comment on our facebook wall or send us an e-mail. booktv, nonfiction books on c-span2. >> the same course we have been on will not lead to a better destination. the same path we're on means $20 trillion of debt. means tripling unemployment stagnant take home pay. depressed home values, devastated military, and unless we change course we may be looking at another recession. so, the question of this election comes down to this. do you want more of the same or do you want real change? >> we know what change looks like, and what governor romney: is selling ain't it. giving more power the biggest banks isn't change. another $5 trillion tax cut for the wealthy is not change. refusing to answer questions about the details of your policies until after the election, definitely not change. >> changing the facts when they're inconvenient to your campaign, not change. >> tuesday night, watch live election coverage on c-span2 with president obama from chicago, and mitt romney in boston, plus key
of the regulars of electricity like california and new york have figured out how to make it attractive to energy providers, electricity providers to provide more efficiency to the ed vintage of the consumer by to reducing rates so there are many things we would be able to agree on and advance the cause of the carbonizing the economy. >> the diversity of fuel sources as well as efficiency travel parallel to the interest of the environmental policy in my judgment. >> we did, the congress did agree on the standards and the administration has continued to work in the industry to move those numbers up even more so there is a classic example of how we did something. >> i wondered if the recommendations you are making i understand that you are trying to bring together all these agencies across the executive branch whether they are of the legislative branch is a very much partner in this. how do your recommendations bring the congressional leaders and to coordinate with them as well as the executive branch leadership? >> we will recommend that this would be institutionalized or created also legislativel
and kirkpatrick democratic candidate and jonathan hunton, a republican event in california 26th district also the democratic when julie of the tony strickland, the republican, and then also michigan first dan, the republican in a four way race is the victor in michigan first district. those are some of the races that have been called. there are a few other out standing once. go to our website come c-span.org, and then also as i told you yesterday in the presidential race, in florida has yet to be called here is the absentee ballot voting delay to push right on the floor of the election. we don't know where the 29 electoral votes will go but have made every outcome of the presidential election. back to the topic here. what was your message to washington? a lot of newspaper articles this morning about the fiscal the cliff and that is what faces -- >> we will leave this portion of this morning's washington journal now to go live to the american enterprise institute for panel discussions on the election with fox news channel commentator michael barone, inside out columnist norman borkenstein and
, a little california adventure, to mar run county, california, after being in manhattan or brooklyn for 21, 22 years. >> host: why'd you move out there? >> guest: we wanted to try something different. our kids were at a nice age where they were out of diapers, but today didn't yet have girlfriends -- [laughter] and we have three boys. and we have this nice thing where we can kind of live anywhere because we have a lot of flexibility. i don't have to go into a office, my wife -- who used to work at mtv -- isn't working there now. and so -- >> host: may we ask who your wife is? >> guest: my wife is alexa robinson, she was a producer at mtv. she wasn't a vijay. >> host: okay. >> guest: and she -- and so we wanted to try and go on some kind of adventure with the kids to take advantage of the fact that we can live anywhere. and i've always loved northern california, and i have a lot of friends out there. because of all the technology projects that i've been involved with and things that i've written about, you know, it was helpful professionally to be out there for a while. so we've been off on
california, you're on with author kenneth davis. >> caller: good morning, mr. davis. mr. davis, you mentioned columbus discovering the new world, but i read that the vikings were it the first on the east coast. and before them came a navigator from ireland. do you have any historical the information on these two? >> guest: short. i address both of those questions in don't know much about geography. one is much more easily incident the other because certainly the vikings were here, when i say here, in north america close of 500 years before columbus arrived. the site of the viking village that they left behind has been excavated. it is now a unesco world heritage site up in newfoundland so that evidence is quite clear and overwhelming. the part of the story that connects to columbus, however, was always the idea that, perhaps, there was some way that columbus knew about the vikings having sailed here. there was even a map that later proved to be a fraud that was said to be something columbus had. there is no evidence to suggest that columbus knew about the vikings or their route to north ameri
south and west as california. those screws that can get in relatively fast have driven in. we still have equipment in teams on the west coast that the concern was still three to five days transit time to get them to the east coast. there's also concern that if they couldn't get back to their fire season when think it's going they would send the resources. so the president directed that we bring to bear dat resources aircraft. so there are teams and equipment that will be airlifted from california, west coast teams to support this response, but also understand that teams for our do nothing well before sandi hit. additional teams called from the midwest and the south, where it makes sense they can drive and faster. whether it makes sense to fly teams in come of the crew starts flying this afternoon. >> thank you, mr. chairman. >> next question from an adrenaline. >> hi, i'm wondering how the contracting process is going. i know some contracts are rhodium placed. this request for proposals for other types of aid. and also, this fema have enough money with a 3.6 billion, especially when the
. i think a lot of it has to do with -- i think people were more shocked by the riot in california. the riot in l.a. tell us about that. how does it really change the black movement? or just the way people perceive civil rights? i guess another way of putting it. what does it do to black community, to white liberalism. what happens with watts? >> guest: to white liberalism, what it does is -- a number of white liberals were shoulder-to-shoulder with blacks in the south, some were killed. after watts a lot of them sat back and said, hmm, these guys, they're not christ like nonviolent civil rights people. they're hoodlums. they're burning -- burn, baby, burn, they're bad people, fighting the police, and burning down buildings. and so this sort of makes a lot of white people cautious and not really sure what is happening here. and they don't like what they see. i'm not a saying that they give up on freedom struggle. johnson doesn't give up on in the freedom struggle. he continues to try to get legislation after this. although initially he is staggered by this how much could this happe
for the big items to come up, currently there is an initiative in california launched by the american bar association to promote the international criminal court and to get the u.s. to join the international criminal court and they are paying for members of the court to come here and meet with american judges. they see this as a long-term process. this is a long-term thing even after they die they hope this is a goal that they will someday reach and we should look at that in protecting the american republic and sometimes it is disturbing to people on our side that says, i mean those that would like to see the american republic survive as long as it possibly can. nothing is forever, so this republic is also not going to last forever. i don't know if that is true because we don't know the future and i will stick with john adams it's rare to last forever and i went to try to make it that way. [applause] >> you are watching book tv on c-span2. joining us now in the studio is malcolm, the founder and the chairman of the foundation of the american writers museum. very quickly, what is the ameri
beyond the louisiana purchase all the way to the border of california. now after this rather less than lengthy preface. why lincoln rejected all meaningful comprise which meant the territories. but there must be one thing more. i'm going talk about three different men tonight. one of you, one of them all of you know know his name abraham lincoln what he was and what he did. the other two not so well known. probably a number of you are familiar with henry clay. the great kentucky statesman. probably few know of william henry in 1860 was a senator from new york state and prior to lincoln's nomination for the presidency, was by far the most notable and well known republican in the country. finally, here i am. ready to start. >>> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. from the jefferson library in char latesville -- relationship to slavery. he reports that -- ownership and labor of the slaifts but america's third president called silent professionals. and jeffrey jefferson's papers in the research. it's just over an hour. >>> our guest speaker this afternoon is henry w
of town meetings and they work incredibly well here. and california is other traditions people can build on. but if they can look inside in order to be a valuable process chemists and he needs to be inclusive, deliberative and needs to be empowered. that provides enough of a firmer are people too sad, you know, here's how we can do it in our area. but enough to to have town meetings and apples. we cannot larges and some other process in california piece of people can take the installation and use it wherever they are to the democratic possibility that rises up locally and hopefully in some ways that can have an impact on the national conversation. >> here we go. i am a librarian for the vermont historical society. we are in the fault of vermont history center. we have a photo album created by a vermonter who went down to view and take pictures of vermont troops during the civil war. he presented the supplements u.s. in 1863 after he had returned from his third trip to virginia, taking pictures mostly of vermonters in camp, but also some other scenes that he saw. one of the scenes that of
organizations. it also features the involvement of the university of california, just working with local communities to rethink and refrain perceptions and understanding of neighborhood security personnel and he would security. there are a lot of, you know, bottom-up approach is to changing the securities sector. we see some of these efforts, important efforts happening in addition to the high-level policy stuff that we have been discussing, such as the police for each ship initiative. >> thank you. i don't know. okay. let's take this as our final question. i have one more very last question to pose to our panel before we break. >> i am independent researcher and consultant. so my question is the same primarily of bob. you know, of course mentioning his paper and highlighted the problems of the challenges. the light footprint, not come so or afghanistan. thousands, if not tens of hundreds of thousands of people on the ground appeal to push the democratization and the ss are forward. so i guess my question, what our considerations are when we engage. what can we do during the conflict to
a senator in ohio. >> host: new york is the biggest state. >> guest: like california today. seward is the founding father of the republican party. this is only the second presidential election the republican party participated in. seward is the dominant figure in the republican party. it's sort of his -- he is more significant than any two other figures in the party combined. chase, another alternative, is the man chiefly responsible for the republican party's power in ohio and, in fact, much of the midwest -- >> host: also a big state. >> guest: even in those days as it is today, and, still, perhaps america's one -- one of america's most famous anti-slavery advocates, a radical abolitionist. he didn't start that way, but at this point he was. seward, not radical on anti-slavery issues was perceived that way because of a series of speeches he gave viewed as inflammatory. lincoln, on the other hand, because he did not have a national record, could convincingly portray himself as the least radical. in those days, the least anti-slavery republican, up for the race. they go it, and sew
into the economy in hard-hit states like nevada, florida, ohio, colorado, pennsylvania and california than any institution. they may be more important than the fed. again, we have to look at money in politics. as i say what was then and in effect of a change of opinion. >> this is very interesting. comments from offers speakers that i want to ask at a demographic group none of you touched on this site because distant name i heard of demography being impactful in america. one out of every five americans has a disability and 51% of likely voters said they have a family member with a disability. yet, at the national press club when there was an opportunity or, as you know, the past president of the press club for the romney campaign and the obama can antisense him to some to speak about disability issues, the romney campaign showed not to attend or issue a position paper on disabilities. so i wanted to ask, why given that one out of every five americans has the disability, 51% of american voters has a family or with a disability. why isn't there more of a conversation about that demographic withi
in a highly competitive and highly mobile labor pool, alabama and california and texas and vermont have some sense that their kids have a common basis of knowledge. so since they came up with the national governors association, i would hope that we could have more discussion. >> i agree. michael gold is really doing a lot of work in the united kingdom. he got all excited. in the k-12 system, it goes to the heart of it. there is this deep belief that we need to develop acute self-esteem so we can perform. we need to do is tell people we need to do that to have self-esteem. because we get that right, that will be great. they are not easy to achieve, but if i could wave a wand i would make k-12 teachers america's heroes. they would be the profession that we all aspire to, they would be places like japan where they call their teachers sensei and you can feel the difference between we view those in america and those in other countries. we have decided to unionize rather than professionalize. when you do that, but you end up with is creating this in k-12. a lot of people disagree. i think that cho
on the board of directors for sutter health, the largest not-for-profit health care organization in california. we've known for a long time that we have to have affordable, quality health care. when joseph asked about the responsibilities, it's all of our responsibilities. under the affordable care act, i think it was the first beginning of what we need to do in order to reform our health care system to make it affordable for all of us. i really like the ability to put my two boys back onto the health care system that we have today until they're 6. i also -- 26. i also like the ability to make sure no one's a slave to their job when it comes to pre-existing conditions. you know, health care is a big deal, but whether it's governor romney becomes president, we're going to have romneycare or we're going to have obamacare, because we need to solve this problem, and we need to solve it immediately. it's a collaborative effort between private, public, state can and local -- state and local government and the federal government. >> moderator: senator hatch? hatch: well, the so-called affordable care
, it was the marriage amendment in california. and if you look at why it won, because it was a crossover of hispanics and most especially black pastors that joined the republicans. is so rather than look at hispanics and blacks from the standpoint of what we white people want to look at, why not ask them what they're interested in? why not look at their values and their cultural agenda and their priorities and address that? and that's where there's great common ground, and i simply don't understand why republicans seemingly are afraid of their own shadow when it comes to that. >> [inaudible] briefly touched on. in the first national election, race and gay marriage, there were a couple ballot initiatives that were successful in that regard. is gay marriage accepted in mainstream america, and -- [inaudible] toward the conservative movement? >> this is an issue that is very much under debate. you're right, there were four blue states yesterday that approved gay marriage, most of them by very, very narrow margins that were far less than the margins in the state legislatures of some of those states. what
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)